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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
, think about paris. cnn's alina cho tells us why in this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. and for dinner, across the street is also great. if you've never been to paris, take an afternoon on a sunny day and ride this boat. they are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts, this museum houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping head to avenue montaigne, the madison avenue of paris. then, grab your walking shoes, walking all the way up and back down is a great way to work off a meal. and speaking of food, don't forget to buy a real baguette sandwich, or a crepe on the street. soon you'll feel like a native. alina cho, cnn, paris. >>> how old is the big blue planet that we're all living on right now? 10,000 years old? or 4.5 billion years old? the one and only bill nye the science guy will tell us what he thinks. at
europe in the single digits, moscow with a high of 6, kiev at 9, and london and paris both at 11 and 12 here starting off your weekend. now let's take a look at your extended forecast. ♪ >>> one more story before we go. a concert was held in vienna featuring the 18th century piano that wolfgang amadeus mozart played in his home. ♪ russian pianist alexander melnikov played the instrument before a small audience at mozart house. the museum and what was once mozart's residence. the piano was sent to vie yaen that from salzburg for the first time since the composer's death more than 200 years ago. the contincert featured pieces composed in that very house. >> we can say that objectively it is an incredible piano and it sounds in such a special way that i believe it can move one to tears. >> the piano is believed to have been made in 1780. mozart bought it soon after he settled in vienna and played it until he died in 1791. the piano is about a meter wide, much smaller than the ones made today. it also has a lighter tone. >> well, it's a shame to know since -- to know what it might have
. the court had earlier blamed continental for a piece of metal that fell on to the paris airport runway. >> in iraq, at least 38 people have been killed and more than 100 injured after a series of bombings in the south of the country. the attacks targeted she of pilgrims as well as local security forces. >> a moscow court has been video showing punk band pussy riot protesting -- banned video for being insulting to orthodox members. two members are serving sentences for hooliganism in the church. >> trial for the former yugoslavia has acquitted the former yugoslavian prime minister in a trial for crimes against humanity. the court said there was no evidence to support accusations. serbs have been protesting along their countries' border in response to that judgment. now to a breakthrough in technology that could help millions of people who depend on hearing aids in their everyday lives. >> if you are one of them, you will know that hearing aids are not much at helping pick out a single voice in a busy room. >> that's true. now scientists say they have found the answer, and they have one
100 is up by about .4%. dax is also up about .4%. in paris, the cac 40 is up about .7%. market players remain cautious as they wait to see the vote by greek lawmakers on the austerity package later in the day. >>> earlier asian stock prices were mostly higher on wednesday. hong kong shares were up about .7%. singapore rose .8%. nikkei average ended marginally lower extending losses to three days. >>> finally a quick look at currencies, the dollar is gaining ground against the yen and euro on the hope that obama's re-election would help prop up the u.s. economy now exchanging hands 80.38 to 39. euro quoted at 12818 to 19. >>> a japanese government panel will draw up a timetable for overhauling the nation's power supply system by the end of this year. an industry ministry task force resumed talks on the reforms on wednesday. that's after the government came up with a new energy policy in september. the policy requires phasing out the reliance on nuclear power and greater use of green energy. under the plan households would be able to choose their power suppliers. the task force also call
would never forget. i shipped off to paris island and this is where i would spend my eighteenth birthday. happy birthday. it is not as bad as the next we birthdays because my nineteenth birthday i was in sniper school, my 22 birthday i was in mountain training in bridgecourt, i have a lot of good birthdays. in paris island, shipped to north carolina infantry training and after that went to hawaii where i was stationed the next three years and this is where i attended sniper school. after attending sniper school i shipped to iraq and in iraq i didn't get to complete my floor because i was bitten on my right hand by vicious enemy spider and suffered severe nerve damage but i will let everyone in the room know that the enemy will stop at nothing. they even train spiders. i turned back home for two years of dismal training and working up to get my hands back and this is why i became a sniper team leader under 500 marines and we were training to go back to iraq. we need five volunteers to go to afghanistan. i said what is the mission? we don't know yet. we just need five volunteers right now.
of the world? i have a great global panel from singapore, the dean of the school of public policy, from paris, dominique moisi, one of france's great public intellectuals. in tel a viv, he's a senior correspondent and here in new york we have rula. >>> brill. she has both israeli and italian citizenship and she has lived and worked a as righter and journalist in both country. dominique, let me start with you. france had a great love affair with barack obama. has it continued? do the french -- are the french still overwhelmingly obama? >> definitely, but i think for different reasons. in 2008 the french would have voted for obama out of hope. in 2012, they would still vote in the huge majority for obama, but more out of fear of a romney victory and of a return of an america they used to dislike. >> republicans have vennially been quite popular. they've been regarded as pro-free trade, hard headed. if you thing of ronald reagan and george bush senior, clearly the elites preferred them. what's the mood right now among its elite? >> well, let me emphasize one point. both romney and obama will be
popular than paris hilton. this congress also has passed fewer laws than any congress since world war ii. i spoke earlier tonight with thomas mann of the brookings institution. he argues that one party is mostly to blame for the gridlock. >> but now the overriding reality is that the republicans have really gone off track and it happened before the tea party, although the tea party has reinforced it. and that extremism has become the major source of america's dysfunctional politics. >> so joining us again, republican strategist ana navarro. here in the studio is the paul babeu, the sheriff of pinal county, arizona. we'll talk about the new gop, the new face of the gop. ana, let's starts with thomas mann. is he right? are republicans to blame for a do-nothing congress? >> no, it takes two to tango. you've got a majority of democrats in the senate, you've got a majority of republicans in the house. it's been a very hard session for congress, very little has gotten done. i think that's true. i'm feeling rather optimistic. we saw something at the end of this week, don, that we haven't seen i
much. [applause] thank-you for all the work, calls, speeches, appearances, resources, and the paris you gave delete from your cells and performed magnificently . you inspire us and humble less. you have been the very best we could imagine. the nation is at a critical point. at a time like this we cannot rest partisan bickering and political posturing. our leaders have to reach across the aisle to do the people's work, and we citizens also have to rise to the occasion. reelected our teachers and professors and count on you not just to teach the to inspire our children with a passion for learning in discovery. elected pastors and priests and rabbis and councils of all kinds to testify of the enduring principles upon which our society is built, honesty, charity, integrity, and family. we look to our parents from the final analysis everything depends on the success of our homes. reelected job creators of all kinds. we are counting on you to invest, hire, step forward. elected democrats and republicans in government at all levels to put the people of the politics. unbelief in america. i beli
's less popular than nixon during watergate, than bp during the oil spill, less popular than paris hilton. this congress also has passed fewer laws than any congress since world war ii. i spoke earlier tonight with thomas mann of the brookings institution. he argues that one party is mostly to blame for the gridlock. >> but now the overriding reality is that the republicans have really gone off track and it happened before the tea party, although the tea party has reinforced it. and that extremism has become the major source of america's dysfunctional politics. >> so joining us again, republican strategist ana navarro. here in the studio is the republican representative for pinellas county, florida. we'll talk about the new gop, the new face of the gop. ana, let's starts with thomas mann. is he right? are republicans to blame for a do-nothing congress? >> no, it takes two to tango. you've got a majority of democrats in the senate, you've got a majority of republicans in the house. it's been a very hard session for congress, very little has gotten done. i think that's true. i'm feeling rat
in great work going on on the other side of the veil. >> the president returned home. the mission in paris was leaderless. someone needed to take over. >> he immediately starts kind of establishing himself as a leader within the church because there's a vacuum. >> those closest to him say the experience had changed him. >> and he made a commitment to himself to work as hard. and i think part of that comes from that experience of going overseas and seeing other people, and having life-threatening experiences and deciding that you're going to-what you're going to make out of your life. and he decided he wanted to make the most he could out of his life, and worked as hard as he possibly could to do that. >> in 1981 barack obama came east to engage the world. especially the black world. he started by moving to the edge of harlem. >> well, if we wanted things to be harder for ourselves, we succeeded wonderfully. it was kind of a gritty neighborhood. the apartment next door to us on the third floor was burned out and stayed that way the whole time that we lived there. we had, like, five locks on
be tempted at some point if they see enough windows to go in. credit agricole shares are sinking in paris due to write downs on it assets in greece and other charges in italy, france and spain. the group had a loss of 2.85 billion euros, revenues down 32% after booking a charge of almost 2 billion euros on the sale of its greek unit. >>> stick around, because coming up in a little bit, german insurer allianz has maintained its 2012 targets despite super storm sandy. we'll speak to the cfo. >> plus coming up we bring you your very own blockbuster. [s #. >>> china releases improved economic data for october on the second day of the communist party congress. beijing inflation continues to cool. >> allianz maintains its full rear target despite super storm sandy on the back of solid quarterly results. we'll hear from the cfo. >> luxury goods make ir announces two ceos but admits to slowing asian sales. >> and credit agricole pays a steep price to exit greece as it takes a hit on the sale to alpha bank. >>> britain's trade deficit narrowed a little bit more than expected in september. third quarte
everyone has a shot. parents, you have got to paris. students, you have got to study. but do not tell me that hiring more teachers will not help the country grow. do not tell me that students should just borrow money -- more money from their parents. that was not an option for me, maybe not for a lot of you. that is why the change i want to bring is to cut tuition and have, make college more affordable. i want 100,000 new math and science teachers. i want to train 2 million americans at community colleges for the jobs people are hiring for right now. that is my plan. that is the america we are fighting for. [cheers and applause] change. change comes when we live up to this country's innovation. i could not be prouder of the american workers and american ingenuity when i bet on the automotive industry. they are not going back to just building cars, we are building better cars. because of technology, because of innovation. cars that we are building now by the middle of the next decade will go trice as far. that will save you money. it will help our national security. it will help our envir
hurtphd in paris. and elizabeth lower-basch got her master's at harvard. william is an independent from massachusetts, you are on. caller: happy thanksgiving. i just want to know, what is poverty in america? what does that mean? host: we discussed that earlier. guest: $20,000 a year, $30,000, $50,000? are these companies sitting on millions of dollars? the governmentwhy are they sitts money when they could be hiring people? host: veronique de rugy, the figure that we decided on for a family of three? guest: $18,000 for a family of four. but a lot of the programs, the poverty programs -- and there are 126 different poverty programs, 22 different food programs, and people always assume there are a few. there are many of them. the eligibility depends on -- food stamps at the federal level are 30%, right? states can add to that number, so it really varies, your eligibility varies on the program, based on the federal standards, and the states once. host: would you like to address the caller's issues about u.s. corporations? guest: when we see surveys of companies, they are nervous about cons
or paris or korea and you start pointing out that now, we are not as good, it will create a sense of maybe there is a complacent view that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence don't see their own kids life is not at all. we need to create some awareness that this is a serious challenge for our country and sadly is changing who we are as a nation where the singer could edit a page as well. >> a project underway, a really good one and also the common core assessments and how your child is doing in relation. we hope world-class standards. at the same time, however, got a smug, suburban constituents the end in the schools that are also grown in the policy makers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum, teaching to the test. you've got a complacent constituency in grumpy teachers. how does the reformer prevail? [laughter] >> well, you know, i think i mentioned this to you, we have to look at this new core of people coming into the profession and that kind of won't run in and dismissive t
to stay during the siege of paris, providing political and humanitarian support. sunday night debt 8:00 eastern on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: michael rich, chief correspondent with the national journal to talk about the latest on the benghazi attacks, susan rice, her possible nomination to be secretary of state. -- michael hirsch. she spoke with three senators about her nomination. guest: she had a meeting with john mccain, instagram, and kelly ayotte, all republicans who have been the chief skeptics about her potential nomination as secretary of state, almost entirely based on what they see as withholding or a distortion of information about the attack in benghazi on september 11 that cost the lives of the u.s. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. -- john mccain, lindsey graham, and kelly ayotte. it is a meeting to try to appease your critics. after she came out of the meeting, it appeared to their opposition to them had increased. if the president intends to nominate susan rice as a successor to hillary clinton as secretary of state -- and most
diplomat to stay during the siege of paris. sunday night at 8:00 p.m. on c- span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now is kim dixon, a tax policy correspondent for reuters. this is part of our series on the so-called fiscal cliff. today we're looking at the issue of the payroll tax cut. kim dixon, when did the payroll tax cuts issue come into effect? guest: about two years ago at this time. expiration of the bush-era tax cuts that began in 2001 were set to expire. republicans control the house. president obama wanted to continue them for everybody except those in the top 2% tax rate. --wasn't ended the year deal it was an end-of-the-year deal. the obama administration was looking for the stimulus measure. they thought it would be hard for republicans to oppose a tax cuts. host: the money rigidly was going where -- the money originally was going where? guest: going to the social security trust fund. it is still going there. it is still going to social security. the treasury is making up the money and still running the money, the discount that folks are getting other tax
ads comparing him to paris hilton. the partly because it was mostly the standard democratic agenda of reversing the bush era and investing in the future. obama cares a lot about policy, but it's not really a policy entrepreneur in the original campaign wasn't really about new ideas. it's about that that message of change and then this aspirational, we can believe in addendum, the same but maybe this guy would follow through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose mi
like london and paris and frankfurt, and what's really important about being in those locations is it gives them an advantage over their competitors in that they're able to provide lower latency, able to provide a shorter distance from point a to point b for their customers. >> so that's something you like, and you've also been looking around at a pharmaceutical company in canada. what do you see there? >> yes, valiant pharmaceutical we think is a pretty interesting not your typical pharmaceutical company. when you think about a big pharma company you think about them spending a lot of money on r&d for drug development. that's not what valeant does. they're spending 3% instead of 20% on revenue. they're going out and they're finding interesting niche drugs and drug companies and acquiring them and they're cutting the expens expenses, plugging the drugs into their distribution and able to add a lot of shareholder value by doing that. >> so what first brought to you valeant? what made you find that company? >> we found it on a screen with our bottom up process we do a lot of scree
but a legend over in europe when he went to germany he was a rock star, ireland, england, paris. they really loved his character j.r. from dallas. iconic. >> the cowboy icon. >> yeah. >> it's nice that he was able to die surrounded by friends in dallas. >> that's great. let's get to rick reichmuth. >> he was in the new dallas, too wasn't he? >> yes he was a reboot on tnt. >> he and the other guy that popped up on there? >> yes. played his father. >> two original cast members. >> you have got about a minute and a half to find out. >> i just gave myself a minute and a half for this weather. never happen. minus 2 this morning in international falls. incredibly cold. we are sending alli there after the show she loves it 12 degrees in minneapolis. cold is moving in behind the cold front. we have got temperatures certainly cooled down here. 15, 20 degrees for a lot of people. so, get ready for that. it will warm up a little bit and this isn't certainly the worst of it another batch of cold air will move in. most of it is across the far northern plains. behind this front, clear skies cooler eastern
martin, coordinator of tea pary patriots. >> for those of us that believe that america is founded is the greatest country in the history of the world we wanted someone would fight for us. we wanted a fighter like ronald reagan that boldly championed america's founding principles who inspired millions of independence and ronald reagan democrats to join us and the idea that america was founded was the shining city upon a hill. will we got was a week moderate candidate hand-picked by the beltway elites in the country, the establishment of the republican party. the presidential loss is unequivocally on them. with a catastrophic loss of the republican elite handpicked candidates, the tea party is the last best hope america has to restore her founding principles. while that may take longer to restore these principles with president obama back in office, we are not going away. it took nearly 100 years to take america to the place where we are today. it will take more than three and a half years to restore our constitution. we are going to keep fighting. we respect the constitution, and w
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)